Matthew Bracken - The Enemies Trilogy

And I have to say that they were very good. I got the first one free during his Amazon giveaway, then bought the next two in quick succession. Very gripping plot line, good flow from book to book, great action sequences. I am quite disappointed that it is over. The only negative thing I have to say about the series was that the dialogue was somewhat cliche, and he tended to bog down a little in the patriotic conversations between the characters.

Overall, the series was a great read.I think I even found some references to a few threads on arfcom as well. I did the same as you OP. Read them quickly.

The other two weren't as good as the first. The second two always seemed to contrived and had more cheese in them.SPOILERAlthough in the first one I didn't think Brad's death was realistic at all. Think about it, a guy is all set up to go sail around the carribean, he's worked at it for years.

And this unknown chick comes in, starts some shit that he repeatedly says he wants no part of and two weeks later and he's dead. So I don't think his dying thoughts are of soldiers, I think they go more like this ' YOU BI IIIT TCHHH!!!' Originally Posted By swampfighter:I plan to purchase Castigo Cay this week.I read the trilogy, and then subsequently bought Castigo Cay. The first 3 books were pretty dang good, but CC was long overdrawn and little plot development. You can really tell the authors love of boating, which is fine however, but holds no interest in me.

I believe he devoted a good 1/3 to 1/2 of the book just on sailing or boating. Not very much action or even charector's conversation, just the main ex-marine thinking to himself.to break it down into arfcom terms: the dude went after his ex gf who bailed on him for a wealthier dude.i was dissapointed. Nobody likes all kinds of novels, or every author. Different strokes for different folks, I'm all about that. But I'm curious to find out which novels the folks on this thread consider to really nail the 2nd Amd, defend-the-Constitution genre.Which current author who writes novels about guns and freedom is a real master of plot and dialogue and so on?

What are the titles of the really terrific novels that deal with America's current slide into despotism and economic ruin? (I'm not talking about super duper CIA assassin novels by the name-brand genre fiction authors.)Surely, if my novels don't reach the bar in the freedom genre, there must be a few novels I have missed that do? I'd like to read them, so that I can improve my craft. What are their titles? Who are their authors?I'm sure UC will be on the short list, even though it was written in 1996, and the first half of its more than 800 pages are a history of shooting in the 20th century. What are some of the other RKBA and freedom-oriented titles that I have missed, where the quality of the writing is just plain superior?I'd really like to know.

I'll be off the grid all day, but I'll check in later on.Matt Bracken / Travis McGee. I've read all 3.I liked EFAD the best and I enjoyed the rest.I see no problem with Brad falling for Ranya. The only thing about Ranya is she seemed too perfect. Good Looking, Shooter, Active, Rides Bikes, Virgin, etc. Most of it was needed for the story development and it was an enjoyable read.

Matt Bracken Trilogy

I liked the action. Many of the good guys buy the farm, so its not like some Disney fairy tale. Each character had their own motivations and stayed pretty true to the character and the main characters develop over time.The problem with any book set in a modern period is that tech and real life events change and makes the books feel old. Nobody has a PDA or a pager anymore.

Hell I havent seen a pager for sale retail any place for years. IPhones and such are ubiquitous now. Some prepaid cell phones have you enter a ton of info to activate them. This makes the story feel a bit dated. I'd prefer this though over beating something to death and rewriting it 30 times and updating it like Patriots STCC. I would like to see some short stories set in that time period of other ops and what others in the setting did.I think the premiss is good.

An ATF boss understands both sides and uses this for a power grab.I'd like to see another book similar set in a different 'universe' written now. The books were better written as far as character development, plot, style, action than other books I have read published by big publishing houses.I haven't read CC yet. I'm not into boating, but appreciate others interest in things they like. One thing I have heard from many successful authors is write what you love and what you know. I think Bracken is doing that.What I would like to see on Bracken's web site, something like Ringo does and have a music play list for the books. I don't want to take notes and many songs were mentioned at least in EFAD.As far as patriot/freedom genre the target audience is small. Though I don't find many issues with EFAD you are going to find a smaller pool of authors and readers.

Some of the books people love like Patriots, I find difficult to read. They can be preachy and it is impossible to please everyone. I mean we all KNOW.45 is better than 9mm and AR's are better than AK's. See what I mean?There are a NUMBER of great authors in SciFi/Fantasy that are on our 'side' Some find them preachy too.

There is a much larger audience in SciFi/Fan. But that genere also doesn't appeal to everyone. Stephen King is a very popular author and I really tend dislike his books, even those that are SciFi/Fantasy. Again you can't please everyone.Some good SciFi authors that are on 'our side' David Webber, Larry Cordiea, John Ringo, Michael Williamson, Bob Heinlein, Orson Scott Card, Niven/Pournell. Hell nearly anyone from Baen Publishing (There are others).

There are a ton. I don't think you see them write in the freedom patriot genre because it is a niche market.

Ringo writes some Action/Adventure and I don't really care for it I like the SciFi better. To each his own.@Bracken, for some inspiration some great books that are very freedom oriented are: Freehold by Michael Williamson. There Will Be Dragons by John Ringo, The Moon is a Harsh Mistress by Heinlein. Lucifer's Hammer; Fallen Angels by Niven/Pournell. Those are what I can think of off the top of my head.

All very well written by established authors and IMHO some of their best works. Each has their own style. As the patriot genre is small you are going to be seeing mostly self published authors and a great deal of it is going to be mixed with survivalist elements as well. In my opinion EFAD and Lights Out and UC are the best books in your genre. Some like Molon Labe, though I like the ideas, are not presented well from the standpoint of a novel. The author writes some good non-fiction but needs work on his fiction. Same with Glenn Beck.

A horrible novel IMHO is Patriots. It is very preachy, contrived, has horrible character development and is a long winded manual on survivalism rather than a novel. I liked some elements of the book, but more from a technical perspective. But hell I hear many people on this board RAVE about what an awesome book it is. I just don't find anything about the group believable. (All the chicks get along, they spend all disposable income on survival supplies for a decade with all the families and women on board and no kids. ) Just not believable, but it is very popular in patriot.survivalist circles.

If you want to improve your craft or get a larger body of readers I would look at maybe doing some action adventure or scifi/fantasy. The good thing about spreading it out in other genre's is that you bring other people into the mindset and get them on your side. I know Heinlein and Orson Scott Card were huge influences on me growing up and are the major reasons WHY I hold the political beliefs that I do. Enders Game and The Moon is a Harsh Mistress and Starship Troopers are all books I read at the right time for me and helped from who I am. If it wasn't sci-fi I never would have read it.

Animal Farm also had influences on me but not until I was older and more mature I was assigned to read it in 9th grade. But the lessons didn't stick till much later. Originally Posted By TravisMcGee:Nobody likes all kinds of novels, or every author. Different strokes for different folks, I'm all about that. But I'm curious to find out which novels the folks on this thread consider to really nail the 2nd Amd, defend-the-Constitution genre.Which current author who writes novels about guns and freedom is a real master of plot and dialogue and so on?

What are the titles of the really terrific novels that deal with America's current slide into despotism and economic ruin? (I'm not talking about super duper CIA assassin novels by the name-brand genre fiction authors.)Surely, if my novels don't reach the bar in the freedom genre, there must be a few novels I have missed that do? I'd like to read them, so that I can improve my craft. What are their titles? Who are their authors?I'm sure UC will be on the short list, even though it was written in 1996, and the first half of its more than 800 pages are a history of shooting in the 20th century. What are some of the other RKBA and freedom-oriented titles that I have missed, where the quality of the writing is just plain superior?I'd really like to know.

Matthew bracken - the enemies trilogy trailer

I'll be off the grid all day, but I'll check in later on.Matt Bracken / Travis McGeeTry a 'A State of Disobedience' by Tom Kratman-Texas rising up against the federal government run by a thinly veiled Hillary Clinton.ETA: oh, good strategy giving away the first novel free Mr. Pusherman-ending up buying the Kindle versions for the next two. Originally Posted By swampfighter:I plan to purchase Castigo Cay this week.I read the trilogy, and then subsequently bought Castigo Cay. The first 3 books were pretty dang good, but CC was long overdrawn and little plot development. You can really tell the authors love of boating, which is fine however, but holds no interest in me.

I believe he devoted a good 1/3 to 1/2 of the book just on sailing or boating. Not very much action or even charector's conversation, just the main ex-marine thinking to himself.to break it down into arfcom terms: the dude went after his ex gf who bailed on him for a wealthier dude.i was dissapointed. 4/10Thanks for the heads up.

Bracken is a good author and a Patriot, he deserves our support. I'm sure he appreciates any honest criticism to help him with his next book.

I look forward to reading more from him. Originally Posted By swampfighter:I plan to purchase Castigo Cay this week.I read the trilogy, and then subsequently bought Castigo Cay. The first 3 books were pretty dang good, but CC was long overdrawn and little plot development. You can really tell the authors love of boating, which is fine however, but holds no interest in me. I believe he devoted a good 1/3 to 1/2 of the book just on sailing or boating. Not very much action or even charector's conversation, just the main ex-marine thinking to himself.to break it down into arfcom terms: the dude went after his ex gf who bailed on him for a wealthier dude.i was dissapointed. 4/10Thanks for the heads up.

Bracken is a good author and a Patriot, he deserves our support. I'm sure he appreciates any honest criticism to help him with his next book. I look forward to reading more from him.No problem. As far as post-economic collapse/freedom fighting authors, he's by far my favorite. I guess after the trilogy, I thought CC would read just like the last 3. Decent book of course, I just couldn't relate to the sailing/boating fans.Bracken deserves our applause and commendation for playing to the Pro 2A crowd.

Authors like that are few and far between. I really enjoyed the trilogy and Castigo Cay. I enjoy cruising and am just not content to be anchored to land.really appreciate all of your books and have learned from all. I am fortunate to have a cruising sailboat and have been many thousand miles and found CC interesting as the Bahamas are one of my favorite cruising grounds.I also have a land anchorage and an old cold war shelter which my family built in the 'cold War' era. It presently and has been stocked for he last 40 years.

Your books have caused both the vessel and shelter to have constant upgrades. Keep up the novels. I have to say that I enjoyed Foreign Enemies the best due to the fact that IMO the only thing that will get us to the state of shooting is a major natural disaster that would bankrupt the government and lead to a gross over reach. A good example that I enjoyed is Deep Winter by Tom Sherry, it is more survival oriented, but it addresses the function of government and the unwinding of a government due to external forces.I have started Castigo Cay, but due to work am in hiatus from pleasure reading. I will also second Tom Kratman as a good author to read. If I was going to keep going in the patriot themed genre, I would look into secession as a theme.

You touched on states separating from Washington in the 3rd novel and I would like to see that explored with emphasis on what it would actually look like. Might be an interesting thought exercise. I would like to see what caused the states to really separate and was leading up to the planned unpleasantness with the foreigners as FE ended.Keep up the good work Mr. Originally Posted By TravisMcGee:Nobody likes all kinds of novels, or every author. Different strokes for different folks, I'm all about that. But I'm curious to find out which novels the folks on this thread consider to really nail the 2nd Amd, defend-the-Constitution genre.Which current author who writes novels about guns and freedom is a real master of plot and dialogue and so on?

What are the titles of the really terrific novels that deal with America's current slide into despotism and economic ruin? (I'm not talking about super duper CIA assassin novels by the name-brand genre fiction authors.)Surely, if my novels don't reach the bar in the freedom genre, there must be a few novels I have missed that do? I'd like to read them, so that I can improve my craft. What are their titles? Who are their authors?I'm sure UC will be on the short list, even though it was written in 1996, and the first half of its more than 800 pages are a history of shooting in the 20th century. What are some of the other RKBA and freedom-oriented titles that I have missed, where the quality of the writing is just plain superior?I'd really like to know. I'll be off the grid all day, but I'll check in later on.Matt Bracken / Travis McGeeI just finished EFAD and loved it, and am going to get the next two off Amazon soon.

However, to play Devil's Advocate, just because a book has a message you may agree with doesn't automatically make it a good book in itself. A mediocre book that shares my beliefs, is still a mediocre book. Thanks for the replies, guys.

I agree my writing has improved since EFAD, but I think the story itself holds up pretty well, especially when compared to Operation Fast and Furious and so on. I like to set my novels about 5 years in the future from 'now,' this gives some plausibility to my projections, without requiring any 'sci-fi' solutions. If a novel is set even 20 years ahead, it's impossible to know if we'll be fighting then with lasers, or rocks. In EFAD there are no smart phones, just cell phones and even pagers, but that's pretty small in the scheme of things for a novel written circa 2002.

(Smart phones play an integral role in Castigo Cay, FWIW.)Can't help ya if you just can't stand reading about boats. Not all 'SHTF' novels can be set only in dusty 4x4 trucks that move between the rifle range and the bugout retreat. Plus, sailing works (at least for me) as an allegory for the search for freedom. In the novels, the 'land' in the USA is becoming increasingly unfree, so the ocean, by comparison, becomes increasingly the haven of those who seek freedom. In EFAD, the sailboat is Brad's escape plan, but only a little of the book is set on a boat, maybe 5% of 560 pages.

There is no sailing in Domestic Enemies, and in Foreign Enemies, the book starts with a shipwreck, and moves exclusively onto the land on about the 3rd page. So to those who say, 'I can't stand all the sailing, so I don't enjoy Bracken's books,' I'd say, that's pretty narrowminded. Out of 3/4 of a million words and 1600 pages in the trilogy, a hundred or so pages set on boats are just too much? Sheesh, guys, expand your horizons! Just look at a sailboat as a mobile escape pod or 'bugout vehicle' that can cover 70% of the globe.

Where you can shoot 24/7 in 360., if that's your thing.Thanks for the suggestions about other authors. I'm a distant relative to Robert Heinlein (my MIL's uncle), but I don't enjoy sci-fi much. Especially when characters hop between galaxies and centuries. For sure I will try Tom Kratman, his novels sound great. I'm surprised they are not offered on Kindle. In the year since I put my books on Kindle, those sales have far surpassed my printed book sales.

I don't understand why Kratman is not putting out e-book versions, unless it's part of his contract with Baen or whoever his publisher is. To me, keeping this control of my work is one of the best aspects of self-publishing. Along, of course, with royalties over 50%, instead of the 7-10% given by most 'real' publishers. (Who needs them anymore, anyway?)Thanks again for the replies on this thread.

Originally Posted By TravisMcGee:In the year since I put my books on Kindle, those sales have far surpassed my printed book sales. I don't understand why Kratman is not putting out e-book versions, unless it's part of his contract with Baen or whoever his publisher is. To me, keeping this control of my work is one of the best aspects of self-publishing. Along, of course, with royalties over 50%, instead of the 7-10% given by most 'real' publishers. (Who needs them anymore, anyway?)Baen (Kratman's publisher) has its own e-book service - including for the Kindle. One of Kratman's books (Caliphate) is available through the Baen free library.I found your not-so-veiled FR references in EFAD amusing.

You didn't get the psycho picture-licking Harpies right, though. Can't help ya if you just can't stand reading about boats. Not all 'SHTF' novels can be set only in dusty 4x4 trucks that move between the rifle range and the bugout retreat. Plus, sailing works (at least for me) as an allegory for the search for freedom. In the novels, the 'land' in the USA is becoming increasingly unfree, so the ocean, by comparison, becomes increasingly the haven of those who seek freedom. In EFAD, the sailboat is Brad's escape plan, but only a little of the book is set on a boat, maybe 5% of 560 pages. There is no sailing in Domestic Enemies, and in Foreign Enemies, the book starts with a shipwreck, and moves exclusively onto the land on about the 3rd page.

So to those who say, 'I can't stand all the sailing, so I don't enjoy Bracken's books,' I'd say, that's pretty narrowminded. Out of 3/4 of a million words and 1600 pages in the trilogy, a hundred or so pges set on boats are just too much? Sheesh, guys, expand your horizons! Just look at a sailboat as a mobile escape pod or 'bugout vehicle' that can cover 70% of the globe. Where you can shoot 24/7 in 360., if that's your thing.Um, Bracken. I said I loved your trilogy.

I further mentioned you should be lauded for your pro-freedom/pro 2A writing. I only was trying to say that the content in CC did not interest me as much as the trilogy did.I mentioned you were my favorite author as of late. Try to accept words of constructive criticism from your fans. They don't like to be insulted.

Matt Bracken was born in Baltimore, Maryland in 1957 and graduated from the University of Virginia in 1979 with a degree in Russian Studies. He was commissioned in the US Navy through the NROTC program at UVA, and then graduated from Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL training class 105 in Coronado California. He served on east coast UDT and SEAL teams, taking a Naval Special Warfare detachment to Beirut in 1983. Bracken left active duty after Lebanon, upon completion of his obligated military service, but he remained in an active reserve status through the remainder of the 1980s. Since then he has lived in Florida, Virginia, South Carolina, Guam and California. Bracken finished building a 48-foot steel sailing cutter of his own design, on which he has done extensive ocean cruising, including a solo voyage 9,000 miles from Panama to Guam and two Panama Canal transits.Quite an impressive resume. After getting EFAD free and reading it, I bought the rest and enjoyed them thoroughly.

Thank you for your service and the free book. Easy and enjoyable read.Brad Fallon reminded me of someone I know. As my friend and I have discussed the direction of our country, he has made it clear he doesn't believe our nation is salvageable.

Matthew Bracken - The Enemies Trilogy Trailer

His plan like Brad's, is to escape to the freedom of the sea. I've been unable to convince him that we as individuals can make a difference and have a responsibility to try.

I suspect Brad Fallon won't convince him either. Originally Posted By TravisMcGee:Thanks for the replies, guys. I agree my writing has improved since EFAD, but I think the story itself holds up pretty well, especially when compared to Operation Fast and Furious and so on.

Matt bracken trilogy

Matthew Bracken - The Enemies Trilogy 2

I like to set my novels about 5 years in the future from 'now,' this gives some plausibility to my projections, without requiring any 'sci-fi' solutions. If a novel is set even 20 years ahead, it's impossible to know if we'll be fighting then with lasers, or rocks. In EFAD there are no smart phones, just cell phones and even pagers, but that's pretty small in the scheme of things for a novel written circa 2002. (Smart phones play an integral role in Castigo Cay, FWIW.)Can't help ya if you just can't stand reading about boats. Not all 'SHTF' novels can be set only in dusty 4x4 trucks that move between the rifle range and the bugout retreat. Plus, sailing works (at least for me) as an allegory for the search for freedom.

In the novels, the 'land' in the USA is becoming increasingly unfree, so the ocean, by comparison, becomes increasingly the haven of those who seek freedom. In EFAD, the sailboat is Brad's escape plan, but only a little of the book is set on a boat, maybe 5% of 560 pages.

There is no sailing in Domestic Enemies, and in Foreign Enemies, the book starts with a shipwreck, and moves exclusively onto the land on about the 3rd page. So to those who say, 'I can't stand all the sailing, so I don't enjoy Bracken's books,' I'd say, that's pretty narrowminded. Out of 3/4 of a million words and 1600 pages in the trilogy, a hundred or so pages set on boats are just too much? Sheesh, guys, expand your horizons! Just look at a sailboat as a mobile escape pod or 'bugout vehicle' that can cover 70% of the globe. Where you can shoot 24/7 in 360., if that's your thing.Thanks for the suggestions about other authors.

I'm a distant relative to Robert Heinlein (my MIL's uncle), but I don't enjoy sci-fi much. Especially when characters hop between galaxies and centuries.

For sure I will try Tom Kratman, his novels sound great. I'm surprised they are not offered on Kindle. In the year since I put my books on Kindle, those sales have far surpassed my printed book sales.

I don't understand why Kratman is not putting out e-book versions, unless it's part of his contract with Baen or whoever his publisher is. To me, keeping this control of my work is one of the best aspects of self-publishing. Along, of course, with royalties over 50%, instead of the 7-10% given by most 'real' publishers. (Who needs them anymore, anyway?)Thanks again for the replies on this thread.I get all of Kratman's stuff from Baen in ePub format which the Kindle can handle.

Originally Posted By TravisMcGee:.snip.Thanks again for the replies on this thread.Thanks for posting! Your EFAD trilogy helped some family of mine start to realize what is actually going on in this country and how easily things could turn far worse. I didn't know about the Castigo Cay trilogy, I'll be ordering them soon. I have sailed competitively and would like to be a cruiser at some point, if only part time, so the CC books pairing sailing with your writing sounds great.ETA: Crap! I hate unfinished book series.

Just realized only the first one(Castigo Cay) was out. Not that it will keep me from buying the book.

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